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Stove shuts off unexpectedly:

This issue is often caused by problems within the burn chamber, the temperature sensors, or the photoeye. These are the areas that we suggest checking.
A dirty burn grate can cause the stove to shut down because it inhibits pellets from burning. Clean the burn grate by using the grate scraper tool to chip away stubborn buildup and remove clinkers. If the brand of pellet fuel you use produces an excessive amount of ash, try switching to higher quality pellets (note, different brands of pellets may require an adjustment to the feed trim to burn properly due to the variety of size and shape)

If the stove runs less than 5 minutes before shutting down, it may not have reached the minimum temperature for the low limit sensor to take control after the start up cycle. Try running the start-up cycle again and if it still shuts down the low limit sensor may be stuck open. The low limit switch is normally open until the exhaust temperature reaches 140°F. The switch then closes until the exhaust temperature drops below 120°F. This switch can be bypassed or read with a multimeter to check for a fault. To bypass, the first step is to unplug your stove so you don’t accidentally short out your control board. After that, you can use a jumper wire, or a metal paper clip to make a connection between the two contacts. After you have done this plug your stove back in if your problem is fixed this is the sensor you need to replace.

Some Whitfield models, including the Optima 2, Optima 3, Profile 20, Profile 30, and the T300P series, have a photoeye proof of flame sensor instead of the low limit switch. This photoeye sensor detects whether a flame is present before signaling more pellets to feed. Try cleaning the photoeye lens and checking the position of the photo eye by shining a light directly in the place where a flame would normally to determine if the photoeye is detecting a flame properly.

The high limit switch may have tripped. This safety switch is normally closed and opens to cut power to the stove if temperatures exceed 250°F. Once the stove cools below 210°F, the switch closes to resume regular stove operation. If this switch is stuck open it would prevent the control board from engaging the blowers and auger motor. Make sure the stove is cool or has been shut off for at least an hour, before either bypassing the switch to test it or checking it with a multimeter. To bypass, the first step is to unplug your stove so you don’t accidentally short out your control board. After that, you can use a jumper wire, or a paper clip to make a connection between the two contacts. After you have done this plug your stove back in if your problem is fixed this is the sensor you need to replace.

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